Marconi Lifetime Achievement Award

From time to time the Marconi Society honors living scientists whose work, in its entirety, has significantly advanced the field of communications and the Internet. The award is made solely at the discretion of the Board of Directors, and nominations are not accepted.

William O. Baker

William O. Baker
2003

Dr. William O. Baker received the Marconi Lifetime Achievement Award for his role as president of Bell Labs and as a widely recognized champion of communications research and development. Under his leadership Bell Labs forged the model for the modern industrial research laboratory.

Dr. Baker died in 2005.

Robert W. Galvin

Robert W. Galvin
2011

Robert W. (Bob) Galvin received the Lifetime Achievement Award for his visionary business leadership and support of the emerging United States cellular telephone and semiconductor industries, and for his early contributions to the Marconi Society.

Mr. Galvin died in 2011.

Amos E. Joel, Jr.

Amos E. Joel, Jr.
2009

Amos E. Joel, Jr. received a posthumous Marconi Lifetime Achievement Award for his work in the field of switching. After spending a 43 year distinguished career at AT&T Bell Laboratories, Joel retired in 1983, continuing to serve as a consultant and worldwide authority on telecommunications switching to AT&T and other companies. In May, 2008, Joel was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame for his patent on the Mobile Communication System. This basic 1972 patent on cellular switching pioneered the most rapidly growing segment of the telecommunications industry. His invention allows for convenient cell phone usage, making them a ubiquitous part of today’s society.

Dr. Joel died in 2008.

Gordon E. Moore

Gordon E. Moore
2005

Gordon E. Moore received the Marconi Lifetime Achievement Award for his work as a co-founder of Intel Corporation, where he spearheaded decades of technological research and developments that made the company a leader in semiconductor manufacturing and technology.

Moore is best known for his 1965 “Moore’s Law” prediction which stated that the number of transistors the industry would be able to place on an integrated circuit would double every year. Moore’s Law has, over the years, paved the way for the exponential increases in computing power at proportionately decreasing costs, helping to bring the cost of computers within reach of millions of new users each year.

Claude Elwood Shannon

Claude Elwood Shannon
2000

Dr. Claude Elwood Shannon received the Marconi Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions in information theory. His concepts underlie the information society in which we live and still are instrumental in fields as varied as computer science, genetics, linguistics and neuroanatomy.

Dr. Shannon died in 2001.